7 Reasons to Wearing both permanent and removable retainers

There are many benefits to wearing both permanent and removable retainers.

One of the most important things is that they prevent teeth from shifting out of position due to too much pressure on one side or another. This can happen when you grind your teeth at night, for example.

Another benefit is that if a tooth shifts, it will be easier to correct with removable retainers because they are less bulky than their permanent counterparts.

They also allow more room for natural wear and tear, which means you’ll have healthier gums in the long run. And finally, unlike with implants, there’s no recovery time after getting your retainers put in!

In this article, we’ll discuss seven reasons to wear both permanent and removable retainers. Also, we’ll discuss the pros and cons of them.

Enabling all-around protection

Wearing both types of retainers will help prevent tooth decay. A removable retainer can help protect the teeth when you don’t wear them, while a permanent retainer also helps protect the teeth if you wear them.

Preventing jaw bone deterioration

Bone degeneration may occur in some people who have surgically removed their wisdom teeth and are not wearing a permanent or removable dental retainer afterwards.

Allowing the jawbone to deteriorate leads to changes in your bite that can lead to tooth crowding or misalignment in your mouth.

Helping with speech problems

When people talk, saliva sometimes gets forced between their upper lip and gum line. This can lead to irritation and hoarseness, which makes speaking difficult.

A dental retainer can help prevent this by keeping your upper lip pulled away from the top of your set of teeth, so saliva doesn’t get forced under there.

It helps maintain space for new teeth.

Suppose you have had all of your wisdom teeth removed without wearing a permanent or removable retainer afterwards.

In that case, gaps may develop between each tooth that will eventually hold replacement teeth in place.

Just as with jaw bone deterioration, this process leads to changes in how your mouth looks and feels when eating, which is often worse than waiting for new teeth to replace the missing ones.

Prevents lisping

When there’s a gap between your upper front teeth, you may lisp when speaking. A dental retainer keeps the teeth together to prevent this and helps with tongue placement in some cases.

It prevents food particles from hiding between teeth.

If your permanent or removable retainer is not being worn each day, food particles have a chance of getting wedged into the space where it once was.

This can cause bad breath that lasts until you can get a new retainer made for your mouth.

Offering an easy solution to minor problems

In certain situations, having both types of retainers will help fix common issues caused by tooth misalignment by simply wearing them, so these problems don’t develop in the first place.

For example, many people start to get a “gummy smile” from the front of their teeth, being too visible when they smile.

A dental retainer can help correct this by covering up this part to develop a lisp isp when their tongue rests too high on the roof of their mouth.

A dental retainer helps by keeping your teeth in better alignment so that doesn’t happen. 

Pros and cons about permanent and removable retainer

Pros and cons about permanent and removable retainer

A permanent retainer will help you avoid the cost of replacing your removable retainer.

Permanent retainers are often much more durable than removable ones, which means that you’ll save money in the long run.

If you chew on your retainer or bite into it, then you’ll need to replace it, but permanent retainers will last much longer.

A lot of adults wear temporary braces to fix their teeth and improve their jaw alignment. When these braces come off, people often feel self-conscious about the gaps in their teeth or misaligned jaws.

A removable retainer can help with this by filling in these gaps or stabilizing your jaw so that it feels more natural to chew and talk again.

The disadvantage of a removable retainer is that sometimes they can fall out of your mouth when you eat or drink. If you have a removable retainer, it is essential to carry an extra one with you at all times so that this doesn’t happen!

Permanent retainers are much less likely to fall out during everyday activities, but they can sometimes “travel” and get stuck in your throat or wind up behind your tongue.

Make sure that the orthodontist who made your permanent retainer knows how to fit them for these scenarios correctly!

Removable retainers are more comfortable than permanent ones because they’re easier to clean and take out.

Removable retainers can be cleaned and taken out quickly. They also come in many different shapes and sizes, so they’re more comfortable than permanent ones.

While this might not seem like an important issue, it is because people with removable retainers report less pain than those who don’t have them at all!

Your teeth may shift if you only wear a permanent retainer, which can lead to future problems with your bite or speech.

Your teeth may shift if you only wear a permanent retainer, which can lead to future problems with your bite or speech.

Plus, both types of retainers typically need to be worn for about 22 hours per day.

Retainers are designed to help keep your teeth straight after orthodontic treatment has ended. Suppose you want to avoid wearing a retainer for the rest of your life.

In that case, you must wear them during this critical period when your adult teeth are emerging and while their roots continue developing under the gums.

This can reduce or even prevent shifting from occurring once all permanent teeth have erupted into place.

However, some adults may still notice slight changes in tooth position over time because other factors such as aging also affect jaw bones and joints.

Retainers should only be removed for eating and brushing, not other activities like playing sports or chewing gum.

Wearing both permanent and removable retainers may help prevent the teeth from shifting again.

This is because you’ll be wearing your retainer for a more extended period, which reduces how much it needs to correct any future changes in tooth position.

Additionally, suppose there are no further adjustments needed after orthodontic treatment has ended.

In that case, this can save additional money by avoiding having braces fitted on top of fixed appliances like headgear or another set of brackets that keep straightening teeth during adulthood.

While some adults might still experience slight movement over time with only one type of retainer worn at home without any other treatments, these effects will generally be far less significant than if they didn’t wear either appliance at all.

Suppose you want to avoid wearing a retainer for the rest of your life. In that case, you must wear them during this critical period when your adult teeth are emerging and while their roots continue developing under the gums.

You’ll have better success at avoiding tooth decay when wearing both types of retainers.

Conclusion

With all of the information we’ve provided, it should be clear that you have a few options when it comes to your orthodontic care.

Whether you choose permanent or removable retainers is up to you and will depend on what type of lifestyle habits and dietary choices you make.

We hope this article has helped in making an informed decision about which option best suits your needs!

 

Leave a Comment